From the Bookshelves

Innovation and resilience, ft. iPhone and iPod co-creator Tony Fadell

Innovation and resilience, ft. iPhone and iPod co-creator Tony Fadell

Jimmy Soni on Elon Musk, Twitter as a stepping stone for everything app X, the PayPal Mafia and more

Jimmy Soni on Elon Musk, Twitter as a stepping stone for everything app X, the PayPal Mafia and more

Can we trust India's drug regulator? Dinesh Thakur and Prashant Reddy weigh in

Can we trust India's drug regulator? Dinesh Thakur and Prashant Reddy weigh in

Workplaces need to be less stressful: Aparna Piramal Raje on living with bipolar disorder

Workplaces need to be less stressful: Aparna Piramal Raje on living with bipolar disorder

On building brands in the social media era, with Anjana Menon

On building brands in the social media era, with Anjana Menon

  • Will Page: What the music industry can teach you about pivoting in the digital age

    Will Page: What the music industry can teach you about pivoting in the digital age

    "What we learn from the music business tells us so much more about who we really are, than other media industries; music is important not only because it was first to suffer and first to recover, but because it was the first to discover who we really are," says Will Page, formerly the chief economist at audio streaming company Spotify. In his book 'Tarzan Economics', Page takes a leaf or two from the music industry to explain how lessons from there can be used by anyone to disrupt an industry. The book talks about eight principles to pivot through disruption

  • Kotler and Sarkar: On brand activism, and why credibility of Indian CEOs is at an all-time low

    Kotler and Sarkar: On brand activism, and why credibility of Indian CEOs is at an all-time low

    Marketing guru Philip Kotler and Christian Sarkar in their new book discuss the seven wicked topics they have identified for brand activism. The book is an insightful read on how brands end up on either side of the regressive or progressive activism debate, with examples like Anita Roddick building the Body Shop. In this conversation, Kotler and Sarkar discuss moral myopia to brands, why credibility of CEOs in India is at an all-time low, to climate change

  • Unpacking untold stories of India's banking ecosystem, with Tamal Bandyopadhyay

    Unpacking untold stories of India's banking ecosystem, with Tamal Bandyopadhyay

    'Pandemonium' by veteran banking editor Tamal Bandyopadhyay narrates untold gripping stories from the Indian banking ecosystem. From the bad loans war room created far from the Mint street in Mumbai, to the arrests made in connection to the disbursal of such loans, he breaks down the nuances of bad loans in India, the key faces, and a collection of rare interviews of all the Reserve Bank of India governors on what they think has caused the big banking mess

  • Binod Chaudhary: Making it big in Nepal

    Binod Chaudhary: Making it big in Nepal

    Binod Chaudhary is Nepal's sole billionaire according to Forbes World Billionaires list for 2021. In his autobiography, 'Making it Big', he writes about building his business, the impact of monarchy and politics, running 160 companies and how he plans to consolidate them now. His company CG Corp Global manufactures the widely popular Wai Wai noodles and has a controlling stake in Nabil Bank. Chaudhary now dreams of a NYSE-listed company—the first one from Nepal

  • Steven Levy: Why Alphabet is more conventional than Google ever was

    Steven Levy: Why Alphabet is more conventional than Google ever was

    Steven Levy has updated his book 'In the Plex' and now takes a look at how Google has changed over the last decade. In the middle of the decade, Larry Page decided to call the company Alphabet. Alpha meant Google and Bet means the new bets or the moonshine projects it will undertake. Levy believes this structure has made it tougher for these bets like the fibre optics business to succeed on their own and a lot of them have eventually failed. He says Google has become something the founders never wanted to be—Conventional

  • Jayadevan P.K: How Xiaomi built a cult following

    Jayadevan P.K: How Xiaomi built a cult following

    In the summer of 2010, Xiaomi Corporation chose to launch as the force behind MIUI, an operating system based on Google's Android OS. Xiaomi officially launched as a mobile phone maker in August 2011. Since then, it has become the largest-selling smartphone manufacturer in India, the 2nd largest smartphone market in the world. In his book on 'Xiaomi', Jayadevan P. K., a tech journalist, traces the journey of China opening up a market for smartphones with Motorola, and how it brought lessons for entrepreneurs in China, including Lei Jun, the main man behind Xiaomi

  • Vivek Wadhwa: Now the Goliaths eat David for lunch

    Vivek Wadhwa: Now the Goliaths eat David for lunch

    The book's title 'From Incremental to Exponential' is a giveaway and its author, Vivek Wadhwa, a tech entrepreneur and a distinguished fellow at Harvard Law School and Carnegie Mellon University joins us on today's episode where he points out there will be more disruption in this decade than in the last 50 years. Wadhwa take us through how legacy companies cut the middleman to stay in the game, why he says AI is an excel sheet on steroids, and why Amazon's monopoly is not a good thing for the Indian market

  • Jeff Immelt: My legacy was controversial at best

    Jeff Immelt: My legacy was controversial at best

    GE was created in 1892 and it finds its roots with Thomas Edison. But after 110 years, in 2018, GE was booted from Dow Jones. Many pointed fingers at the senior management. In this tell-all podcast, Jeffery Immelt the ex-CEO of GE talks about his time leading the conglomerate, including decisions that went wrong and some which will bear fruits later. In his book Hot Seat, Immelt talks about the various business verticals in detail, especially the breaking up of GE Capital which was one of the drivers of the conglomerate

  • Nitin Rakesh: 8 principles for companies to follow in post pandemic world

    Nitin Rakesh: 8 principles for companies to follow in post pandemic world

    The book 'Transformation In Times of Crisis' by Nitin Rakesh, CEO of Mphasis and Professor Jerry Wind, who taught at Wharton School, delves upon how enterprises are rewiring themselves and adapting to the new normal to survive. The book outlines key eight principles which include agility, mental models, digital transformation, tapping open talent resources, among other ideas. The book prods companies to ask themselves to build their new strategy for the new normal

  • Shiv Shivakumar: How to deal with the ten most important career dilemmas

    Shiv Shivakumar: How to deal with the ten most important career dilemmas

    All of us go through career dilemmas at some point. Shivakumar discusses the top ten dilemmas that we may experience and backs them with research and data to analyse how we can make better career moves. In his book, 'The Right Choice', he says India produces nearly half a million MBAs every year but less than 5 percent of an IIM batch makes it to the CEO's office, thus explaining that merely possessing a degree from a prestigious institute does not guarantee a ticket to the corner office. He discusses the importance of career moves, board membership and CEO's dilemmas

  • Raja Rajamannar: Marketers should harness new tech to stay relevant

    Raja Rajamannar: Marketers should harness new tech to stay relevant

    Marketers, globally, are facing an existential crisis as more companies are losing confidence in what marketers can do for their brands. In this book, Rajamannar points out what he calls quantum marketing, the fifth paradigm, that can help marketers to stay relevant in the business. The need to adopt experiential marketing, harnessing machine learning, artificial intelligence, 5G, and more relevant data to create campaigns which can resonate with customers. He also talks about the new ways that he is planning to launch campaigns for Mastercard